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Teahupoo

All the information you need on Teahupoo

Tahiti's Teahupoo (pronounced cho-po) is basically a glorified closeout -- a horrific, lethal barrel foretelling a great deal of trouble as even the most competent of surfers. In recent years, pro competitions and high-profile tow-ins have bombed us with pictures of her apparently perfect barrels, but no other surf spot distills a more eminent toll than Teahupoo, the hardest wave in the cosmos.

Teahupoo is a village on the southwest coast of the island of Tahiti, French Polynesia, southerly Pacific. It is acknowledged for the surf break and backbreaking, glazed curls offshore, often achieving 2 to 3 m (7 to 10 ft) and up to seventy feet. It's the site of the yearly Billabong Pro Tahiti surf contest, part of the World Championship Tour (WCT) of the Association of Surfing Professionals World Tour surfing circuit and used to be one stop in the World Tour of the International Bodyboarding Association.

Teahupo'o is a reef break. The swells primarily break left, but the outermost reef also produces right breaks that surfers must be cautious of while paddling out. Teahupo'o is also famous for the consistent quantity of barrels it pitches. It is a honouring location and is widely regarded for being on the 'must-surf' listing of every avid surfer. However, only seasoned surfers in prime physical condition ought undertake Teahupo'o; grueling waves blended with a knee-deep shoreline can result in severe traumas and even destruction in a wipeout .

Ages ago, freshwater from the mountains coursed into the ocean, eating away the reef and producing what is acknowledged nowadays as Passe Havae. The pass is set where the township paved road ends, thus its early name, "The End of the Road." The channel at Teahupoo isn't really a channel in the least, as the wave bends and runs along into a beneath sea level dry reef closeout. A 15-minute paddle from dry land, Teahupoo's serious anatomy answers from a drastic modification in gradient as mighty swells leave a lightly inclining bed and are thrust forward by the reef. The lip -- as dense as it is tall -- pitches with such speed that one must take off under it to avoid being launched. Backbone solely may cut it at some big-wave venues, but here they'll get you obliterated.

Bodyboarding innovators Mike Stewart and Ben Severson were the foremost to surf Teahupo'o in 1986 and it shortly became an secret spot for thrill-seeking bodyboarders. A couple of pro surfers teased Teahupo'o during the early 1990s and it was only in 1998, at the Gotcha Tahiti Pro, that Teahupo'o became widely accepted as bearing some of the biggest waves in the world. On August 17, 2000 Laird Hamilton is accredited with surfing the "fattest wave" ever razzed, authenticated in the movie Riding Giants. In 2003 the former Malik Joyeux successfully ragged one of the most bombastic waves ever driven.

As it turned out, every surfer and every wave ridden to that point was just the ante; the heavy betting would take place August 17, 2000. Tow-in innovator and unmatchable hellman Laird Hamilton was ripped into a wave that by all accounts was the biggest ever teased. On his backhand, Hamilton got in early, set his line and skyrocketed through the Lincoln Tunnel, an experience so impressing it would bring him to tears trying to depict it. One error, and he surely would have exited.

It's difficult to envisage Teahupoo one day seeming savourless and being relieved of its "greatest wave in the world" status by some other, more fearful spot. Undiscovered reefs dwindle in number every day and the chances are cut down. The wave before the sleepy-eyed minuscule town of Teahupoo may just be the end of the road.Tahiti's Teahupoo (pronounced cho-po) is basically a glorified closeout -- a horrific, lethal barrel foretelling a great deal of trouble as even the most competent of surfers. In recent years, pro competitions and high-profile tow-ins have bombed us with pictures of her apparently perfect barrels, but no other surf spot distills a more eminent toll than Teahupoo, the hardest wave in the cosmos.

Teahupoo is a village on the southwest coast of the island of Tahiti, French Polynesia, southerly Pacific. It is acknowledged for the surf break and backbreaking, glazed curls offshore, often achieving 2 to 3 m (7 to 10 ft) and up to seventy feet. It's the site of the yearly Billabong Pro Tahiti surf contest, part of the World Championship Tour (WCT) of the Association of Surfing Professionals World Tour surfing circuit and used to be one stop in the World Tour of the International Bodyboarding Association.

Teahupo'o is a reef break. The swells primarily break left, but the outermost reef also produces right breaks that surfers must be cautious of while paddling out. Teahupo'o is also famous for the consistent quantity of barrels it pitches. It is a honouring location and is widely regarded for being on the 'must-surf' listing of every avid surfer. However, only seasoned surfers in prime physical condition ought undertake Teahupo'o; grueling waves blended with a knee-deep shoreline can result in severe traumas and even destruction in a wipeout .

Ages ago, freshwater from the mountains coursed into the ocean, eating away the reef and producing what is acknowledged nowadays as Passe Havae. The pass is set where the township paved road ends, thus its early name, "The End of the Road." The channel at Teahupoo isn't really a channel in the least, as the wave bends and runs along into a beneath sea level dry reef closeout. A 15-minute paddle from dry land, Teahupoo's serious anatomy answers from a drastic modification in gradient as mighty swells leave a lightly inclining bed and are thrust forward by the reef. The lip -- as dense as it is tall -- pitches with such speed that one must take off under it to avoid being launched. Backbone solely may cut it at some big-wave venues, but here they'll get you obliterated.

Bodyboarding innovators Mike Stewart and Ben Severson were the foremost to surf Teahupo'o in 1986 and it shortly became an secret spot for thrill-seeking bodyboarders. A couple of pro surfers teased Teahupo'o during the early 1990s and it was only in 1998, at the Gotcha Tahiti Pro, that Teahupo'o became widely accepted as bearing some of the biggest waves in the world. On August 17, 2000 Laird Hamilton is accredited with surfing the "fattest wave" ever razzed, authenticated in the movie Riding Giants. In 2003 the former Malik Joyeux successfully ragged one of the most bombastic waves ever driven.

As it turned out, every surfer and every wave ridden to that point was just the ante; the heavy betting would take place August 17, 2000. Tow-in innovator and unmatchable hellman Laird Hamilton was ripped into a wave that by all accounts was the biggest ever teased. On his backhand, Hamilton got in early, set his line and skyrocketed through the Lincoln Tunnel, an experience so impressing it would bring him to tears trying to depict it. One error, and he surely would have exited.

It's difficult to envisage Teahupoo one day seeming savourless and being relieved of its "greatest wave in the world" status by some other, more fearful spot. Undiscovered reefs dwindle in number every day and the chances are cut down. The wave before the sleepy-eyed minuscule town of Teahupoo may just be the end of the road.

Peaking With Carlos Burle

July 1st, 2013
I'm sure no one has forgotten that mighty swell that smashed through Teahupoo, Tahiti, this may? How could you. Red Bull follows Brazialian big wave surfer, Carlos Burle, during the swell. Red Bull are at the cutting edge of surf documentaries right now and Peaking With Carlos Burle proves this.

TEAHUPO’O RAW

April 11th, 2013
Everyone has been the ferociousness of Teahupoo but few have ever experienced if first hand. From the depths come some more great footage of yet another epic Teahupoo session from the final day of the WCT event trials. Bruce and Andy Irons paddle out late in the session and put on, as Lost so aptly describe it, “a performance for the ages.”

The New Angle Of Teahupo‘o

December 4th, 2012

Anthony Walsh gives us a uniquely beautiful view of the inside lip of a wave. Now airing as a national TV Commercial. Aussie barrel beast and GoPro team rider Anthony Walsh provides a new and completely unique video angle at Teahupoo. The clip is airing as a TV commercial in the States, you like? Shot 100% on the HERO3® camera from ‪http://GoPro.com MUSIC: OVERWERK “Daybreak” [...]

The Teahupoo Way Of Life

August 3rd, 2012

Billabong Pro Episode Tahiti 1 – The Teahupoo way of life The Billabong Tahiti Pro doesn’t kick off until 16th August, but over the next few weeks Billabong will be posting regular webisodes about the infamous Teahupoo. I’m sure we are all hoping that the waves are as good as they were last year! This episode from Billabong focuses on how awesome Tahiti is as [...]

The Teahupocalypse in super slow motion from a Phantom Camera During the Billabong Pro in Tahiti on August 27, 2011, the contest on surfing’s World Tour was placed on hold due to a monumental swell bearing down on the famous big wave spot, Teahupoo. With forecasts calling for unprecedented surf, many of the heaviest surfers in the world descended on the island to be in [...]

How did I miss this? TEAHUPOO, Saturday, August 27, 2011, The Billabong Pro Tahiti, Event No. 5 of 11 on the 2011 ASP World Title season, had to be called off for the day with waves being reported in the 15 – 20 foot (5 – 7 metre) range. “We’ve certainly never seen Teahupoo in these conditions and it’s not possible to paddle in today [...]

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